Educator Resources

Educator Resources

Educator Resources

Want to know more about implementing the roadmap in your classroom?
Read the Pedagogy Companion

The curated resources linked below are an initial sample of the resources coming from a collaborative and rigorous review process with the EAD Content Curation Task Force.

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Assessing Access
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Learning for Justice
Theodore Roosevelt and the 1912 Election
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: The Shapell Manuscript Foundation
Smithsonian National Youth Summit on Teen Resistance to Systemic Racism
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection/Teaching Strategy
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
World101: Global Era Issues
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: World 101 from the Council on Foreign Relations
The Constitutional Convention
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: C-SPAN Television Networks/C-SPAN Classroom
Jim Crow and Segregation: Primary Source Set
Grades 6–8:
 
Resource Collection
Source: The Library of Congress
The Constitution: Primary Source Set
Grades 6–8:
 
Resource Collection
Source: The Library of Congress
Personal Narrative
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: High Resolves
Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow
Grades 6–8:
 
Unit Plan
Source: New-York Historical Society
The Creek War of 1813-1814: What Would You Do?
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan/Teaching Strategy
Source: David Mathews Center for Civic Life
My Town & the Three Branches of Government: The Mayor Needs Help
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Constitutional Rights Foundation
Stereotypes
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: High Resolves
Seventh Generation
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: High Resolves
WHO COUNTS? A Look at Voter Rights through Political Cartoons
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: Massachusetts Historical Society
Cooperative Comics
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Learning for Justice
Part of a Community Online
Grades K–2:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Learning for Justice
One Survivor Remembers: A Call to Action
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Learning for Justice
How the Separation of Powers Levels the Playing Field in Sports
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts
How the Rule of Law Protects Individual Rights
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts
America Transformed: Native Viewpoints on 19th Century Westward Expansion
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center
Bending Lines: Maps and Data from Distortion to Deception
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection
Source: Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center
Letters for a Cause: Activism Through the Post
Grades 3–5:
 
Resource Collection
Source: Smithsonian National Postal Museum
Students 'Sit' for Civil Rights
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan/Teaching Strategy
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
A Sailor's Life for Me
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan/Games + Interactive/Resource Collection
Source: USS Constitution Museum
Separate and Unequal in 1963
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Teaching Strategy
Source: David Mathews Center for Civic Life
9/11 and the Constitution
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Center for Civic Education
Article II: The Executive Branch
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Article III: The Judicial Branch
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Article V: The Amendment Process
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Eagle Eye Citizen
Grades 6–8:
 
Games + Interactive
Source: Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Constitutional Conversations and Civil Dialogue
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Women & the American Story: Growth and Turmoil, 1948-1976
Grades 9–12:
 
Unit Plan/Resource Collection
Source: New-York Historical Society
Exploring Personal Identity
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Autry Museum of the American West
Civil Liberties
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction
Grades 9–12:
 
Unit Plan/Resource Collection
Source: National Constitution Center
Women & the American Story: A Nation Divided, 1832-1877
Grades 6–8:
 
Unit Plan/Resource Collection
Source: New-York Historical Society
State and Local Government
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Dawnland Teacher's Guide
Grades 9–12:
 
Unit Plan
Source: Upstander Project
Civics Connection: The Role of Government According to the Founders and Progressives
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Civics Connection: Equality, the Civil War, and Reconstruction
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Civics Connection: Apple of Gold in a frame of Silver
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Why do people celebrate on the Fourth of July?
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan
Source: History's Mysteries Historical Inquiry for Elementary Classrooms
"Should our state or community raise the minimum wage?" High School Deliberation
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Teaching Strategy
Source: Street Law Inc.
Perceptual Set
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: High Resolves
Suffrage: Black Women and the Right to Vote
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: New American History
Haudenosaunee Guide for Educators
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan/Resource Collection/Teacher Resource
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Honoring Original Indigenous Inhabitants: Land Acknowledgement
Grades K–2:
 
Resource Collection/Teacher Resource
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Early Encounters in Native New York: Did Native People Really Sell Manhattan?
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
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We the People

This theme explores the idea of “the people” as a political concept–not just a group of people who share a landscape but a group of people who share political ideals and institutions.

Read more about the theme in:

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Institutional & Social Transformation

This theme explores how social arrangements and conflicts have combined with political institutions to shape American life from the earliest colonial period to the present, investigates which moments of change have most defined the country, and builds understanding of how American political institutions and society changes.

Read more about the theme in:

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Contemporary Debates & Possibilities

This theme explores the contemporary terrain of civic participation and civic agency, investigating how historical narratives shape current political arguments, how values and information shape policy arguments, and how the American people continues to renew or remake itself in pursuit of fulfillment of the promise of constitutional democracy.

Read more about the theme in:

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Civic Participation

This theme explores the relationship between self-government and civic participation, drawing on the discipline of history to explore how citizens’ active engagement has mattered for American society and on the discipline of civics to explore the principles, values, habits, and skills that support productive engagement in a healthy, resilient constitutional democracy. This theme focuses attention on the overarching goal of engaging young people as civic participants and preparing them to assume that role successfully.

Read more about the theme in:

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Our Changing landscapes

This theme begins from the recognition that American civic experience is tied to a particular place, and explores the history of how the United States has come to develop the physical and geographical shape it has, the complex experiences of harm and benefit which that history has delivered to different portions of the American population, and the civics questions of how political communities form in the first place, become connected to specific places, and develop membership rules. The theme also takes up the question of our contemporary responsibility to the natural world.

Read more about the theme in:

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A New Government & Constitution

This theme explores the institutional history of the United States as well as the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional design.

Read more about the theme in:

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A People in the World

This theme explores the place of the U.S. and the American people in a global context, investigating key historical events in international affairs,and building understanding of the principles, values, and laws at stake in debates about America’s role in the world.

Read more about the theme in:

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

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Driving questions provide a glimpse into the types of inquiries that teachers can write and develop in support of in-depth civic learning. Think of them as a  starting point in your curricular design.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in  the Pedagogy Companion.

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Sample guiding questions are designed to foster classroom discussion, and can be starting points for one or multiple lessons. It is important to note that the sample guiding questions provided in the Roadmap are NOT an exhaustive list of questions. There are many other great topics and questions that can be explored.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in the Pedagogy Companion.

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

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The Five Design Challenges

America’s constitutional politics are rife with tensions and complexities. Our Design Challenges, which are arranged alongside our Themes, identify and clarify the most significant tensions that writers of standards, curricula, texts, lessons, and assessments will grapple with. In proactively recognizing and acknowledging these challenges, educators will help students better understand the complicated issues that arise in American history and civics.

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Motivating Agency, Sustaining the Republic

  • How can we help students understand the full context for their roles as civic participants without creating paralysis or a sense of the insignificance of their own agency in relation to the magnitude of our society, the globe, and shared challenges?
  • How can we help students become engaged citizens who also sustain civil disagreement, civic friendship, and thus American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we help students pursue civic action that is authentic, responsible, and informed?
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America’s Plural Yet Shared Story

  • How can we integrate the perspectives of Americans from all different backgrounds when narrating a history of the U.S. and explicating the content of the philosophical foundations of American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we do so consistently across all historical periods and conceptual content?
  • How can this more plural and more complete story of our history and foundations also be a common story, the shared inheritance of all Americans?
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Simultaneously Celebrating & Critiquing Compromise

  • How do we simultaneously teach the value and the danger of compromise for a free, diverse, and self-governing people?
  • How do we help students make sense of the paradox that Americans continuously disagree about the ideal shape of self-government but also agree to preserve shared institutions?
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Civic Honesty, Reflective Patriotism

  • How can we offer an account of U.S. constitutional democracy that is simultaneously honest about the wrongs of the past without falling into cynicism, and appreciative of the founding of the United States without tipping into adulation?
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Balancing the Concrete & the Abstract

  • How can we support instructors in helping students move between concrete, narrative, and chronological learning and thematic and abstract or conceptual learning?
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Each theme is supported by key concepts that map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. They are vertically spiraled and developed to apply to K—5 and 6—12. Importantly, they are not standards, but rather offer a vision for the integration of history and civics throughout grades K—12.

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Helping Students Participate

  • How can I learn to understand my role as a citizen even if I’m not old enough to take part in government? How can I get excited to solve challenges that seem too big to fix?
  • How can I learn how to work together with people whose opinions are different from my own?
  • How can I be inspired to want to take civic actions on my own?
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America’s Shared Story

  • How can I learn about the role of my culture and other cultures in American history?
  • How can I see that America’s story is shared by all?
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Thinking About Compromise

  • How can teachers teach the good and bad sides of compromise?
  • How can I make sense of Americans who believe in one government but disagree about what it should do?
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Honest Patriotism

  • How can I learn an honest story about America that admits failure and celebrates praise?
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Balancing Time & Theme

  • How can teachers help me connect historical events over time and themes?
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