Educator Resources

Educator Resources Educator Resources

Want to know more about implementing the roadmap in your classroom?
Professional DevelopmentPedagogy Companion

The curated resources linked below are an initial sample of the resources coming from a collaborative and rigorous review process with the EAD Content Curation Task Force.

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America’s Plural Yet Shared Story+
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60-Second Civics
Grades 9–12:
 
Teaching Strategy/Assessment
Source: Center for Civic Education
9/11 and the Constitution
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Center for Civic Education
A Sailor's Life for Me
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan/Games + Interactive/Resource Collection
Source: USS Constitution Museum
America Transformed: Native Viewpoints on 19th Century Westward Expansion
Grades 9–12:
 
Resource Collection
Source: Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center
American Experiments: Ideals and Images
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan/Games + Interactive/Teaching Strategy
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
American Indians in a Changing World
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan/Lesson Plan
Source: The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History
Annexation of Hawaii
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Stanford History Education Group
Art and Activism: Gold Rush
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Autry Museum of the American West
Assessing Access
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Learning for Justice
Barriers to Voting: Poll Taxes
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Battle of Lexington
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Stanford History Education Group
Battle of Little Bighorn
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Stanford History Education Group
Bearing Witness to Japanese American Incarceration
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Facing History and Ourselves
Becoming US - Unit: Policy
Grades 9–12:
 
Unit Plan/Lesson Plan
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
Beyond the Battlefield: Virtual Field Trip feat. Author Lauren Tarshis
Grades 3–5:
 
Multimedia
Source: Museum of the American Revolution
Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow
Grades 6–8:
 
Unit Plan
Source: New-York Historical Society
Building Tools for Civic Discourse: Developing Empathy
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Mikva Challenge
Changemaker Biographies
Grades 6–8:
 
Resource Collection
Source: The Democratic Knowledge Project - Harvard University
Child Labor
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Stanford History Education Group
Civics Connection: Liberty and Union
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Civil Rights Toolkit
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection/Assessment
Source: Ashbrook/TeachingAmericanHistory
Dawnland Teacher's Guide
Grades 9–12:
 
Unit Plan
Source: Upstander Project
Deliberation Guide. Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
Documents and Debates Vol.1 Ch1: Early Contact
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection
Source: Ashbrook/TeachingAmericanHistory
Dolores Huerta: Collaborating to Affect Change
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Citizen U
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Nonviolence
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan/Lesson Plan/Resource Collection
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of American History
Dred Scott v. Sandford: Supreme Court Case Pack for Middle School Classrooms
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection/Teaching Strategy
Source: Street Law Inc.
Early Encounters in Native New York: Did Native People Really Sell Manhattan?
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Exploring Personal Identity
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Autry Museum of the American West
Finding Freedom Online Interactive
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan/Lesson Plan/Games + Interactive
Source: Museum of the American Revolution
Freedom's Journal
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Stanford History Education Group
Haudenosaunee Guide for Educators
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan/Resource Collection/Teacher Resource
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Home at Mount Vernon
Grades K–2:
 
Lesson Plan/Resource Collection
Source: George Washington's Mount Vernon
Honoring Original Indigenous Inhabitants: Land Acknowledgement
Grades K–2:
 
Resource Collection/Teacher Resource
Source: Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
How did Kossula Cudjo Lewis and other enslaved people experience the Atlantic World?
Grades 3–5:
 
Unit Plan
Source: History's Mysteries Historical Inquiry for Elementary Classrooms
How do communities make good decisions?
Grades K–2:
 
Unit Plan
Source: History's Mysteries Historical Inquiry for Elementary Classrooms
How do we celebrate our shared traditions?
Grades K–2:
 
Unit Plan
Source: History's Mysteries Historical Inquiry for Elementary Classrooms
How the Separation of Powers Levels the Playing Field in Sports
Grades 9–12:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts
“I Can’t Even Get To The Back of the Bus” 504 and the Power of Protest
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Emerging America - Collaborative for Educational Services
Identity & Community: An Introduction to 6th Grade Social Studies
Grades 6–8:
 
Unit Plan
Source: Facing History and Ourselves
In or Out: Race and Disability as Legal Barriers to Immigration
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Emerging America - Collaborative for Educational Services
Influence Library
Grades 6–8:
 
Unit Plan
Source: iCivics, Inc.
Jim Crow and Segregation: Primary Source Set
Grades 6–8:
 
Resource Collection
Source: The Library of Congress
John Brown and Self-Deception
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Bill of Rights Institute
Joining the Struggle: Young Activists in Birmingham, 1963
Grades 6–8:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Kids, Collaboration, and Coalitions
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: Citizen U
Lesson Plan: Votes for Women!
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan/Multimedia
Source: The Civic Circle
Lesson Plan: What is Democracy?
Grades 3–5:
 
Lesson Plan
Source: The Civic Circle
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We the People

This theme explores the idea of “the people” as a political concept–not just a group of people who share a landscape but a group of people who share political ideals and institutions.

Read more about the theme in:

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Institutional & Social Transformation

This theme explores how social arrangements and conflicts have combined with political institutions to shape American life from the earliest colonial period to the present, investigates which moments of change have most defined the country, and builds understanding of how American political institutions and society changes.

Read more about the theme in:

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Contemporary Debates & Possibilities

This theme explores the contemporary terrain of civic participation and civic agency, investigating how historical narratives shape current political arguments, how values and information shape policy arguments, and how the American people continues to renew or remake itself in pursuit of fulfillment of the promise of constitutional democracy.

Read more about the theme in:

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Civic Participation

This theme explores the relationship between self-government and civic participation, drawing on the discipline of history to explore how citizens’ active engagement has mattered for American society and on the discipline of civics to explore the principles, values, habits, and skills that support productive engagement in a healthy, resilient constitutional democracy. This theme focuses attention on the overarching goal of engaging young people as civic participants and preparing them to assume that role successfully.

Read more about the theme in:

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Our Changing landscapes

This theme begins from the recognition that American civic experience is tied to a particular place, and explores the history of how the United States has come to develop the physical and geographical shape it has, the complex experiences of harm and benefit which that history has delivered to different portions of the American population, and the civics questions of how political communities form in the first place, become connected to specific places, and develop membership rules. The theme also takes up the question of our contemporary responsibility to the natural world.

Read more about the theme in:

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A New Government & Constitution

This theme explores the institutional history of the United States as well as the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional design.

Read more about the theme in:

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A People in the World

This theme explores the place of the U.S. and the American people in a global context, investigating key historical events in international affairs,and building understanding of the principles, values, and laws at stake in debates about America’s role in the world.

Read more about the theme in:

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

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Driving questions provide a glimpse into the types of inquiries that teachers can write and develop in support of in-depth civic learning. Think of them as a  starting point in your curricular design.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in  the Pedagogy Companion.

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Sample guiding questions are designed to foster classroom discussion, and can be starting points for one or multiple lessons. It is important to note that the sample guiding questions provided in the Roadmap are NOT an exhaustive list of questions. There are many other great topics and questions that can be explored.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in the Pedagogy Companion.

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

X

The Five Design Challenges

America’s constitutional politics are rife with tensions and complexities. Our Design Challenges, which are arranged alongside our Themes, identify and clarify the most significant tensions that writers of standards, curricula, texts, lessons, and assessments will grapple with. In proactively recognizing and acknowledging these challenges, educators will help students better understand the complicated issues that arise in American history and civics.

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Motivating Agency, Sustaining the Republic

  • How can we help students understand the full context for their roles as civic participants without creating paralysis or a sense of the insignificance of their own agency in relation to the magnitude of our society, the globe, and shared challenges?
  • How can we help students become engaged citizens who also sustain civil disagreement, civic friendship, and thus American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we help students pursue civic action that is authentic, responsible, and informed?
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America’s Plural Yet Shared Story

  • How can we integrate the perspectives of Americans from all different backgrounds when narrating a history of the U.S. and explicating the content of the philosophical foundations of American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we do so consistently across all historical periods and conceptual content?
  • How can this more plural and more complete story of our history and foundations also be a common story, the shared inheritance of all Americans?
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Simultaneously Celebrating & Critiquing Compromise

  • How do we simultaneously teach the value and the danger of compromise for a free, diverse, and self-governing people?
  • How do we help students make sense of the paradox that Americans continuously disagree about the ideal shape of self-government but also agree to preserve shared institutions?
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Civic Honesty, Reflective Patriotism

  • How can we offer an account of U.S. constitutional democracy that is simultaneously honest about the wrongs of the past without falling into cynicism, and appreciative of the founding of the United States without tipping into adulation?
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Balancing the Concrete & the Abstract

  • How can we support instructors in helping students move between concrete, narrative, and chronological learning and thematic and abstract or conceptual learning?
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Each theme is supported by key concepts that map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. They are vertically spiraled and developed to apply to K—5 and 6—12. Importantly, they are not standards, but rather offer a vision for the integration of history and civics throughout grades K—12.

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Helping Students Participate

  • How can I learn to understand my role as a citizen even if I’m not old enough to take part in government? How can I get excited to solve challenges that seem too big to fix?
  • How can I learn how to work together with people whose opinions are different from my own?
  • How can I be inspired to want to take civic actions on my own?
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America’s Shared Story

  • How can I learn about the role of my culture and other cultures in American history?
  • How can I see that America’s story is shared by all?
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Thinking About Compromise

  • How can teachers teach the good and bad sides of compromise?
  • How can I make sense of Americans who believe in one government but disagree about what it should do?
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Honest Patriotism

  • How can I learn an honest story about America that admits failure and celebrates praise?
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Balancing Time & Theme

  • How can teachers help me connect historical events over time and themes?
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The Six Pedagogical Principles

 EAD teacher draws on six pedagogical principles that are connected sequentially.

Six Core Pedagogical Principles are part of our Pedagogy Companion. The Pedagogical Principles are designed to focus educators’ effort on techniques that best support the learning and development of student agency required of history and civic education.

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This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

EAD teachers commit to learn about and teach full and multifaceted historical and civic narratives. They appreciate student diversity and assume all students’ capacity for learning complex and rigorous content. EAD teachers focus on inclusion and equity in both content and approach as they spiral instruction across grade bands, increasing complexity and depth about relevant history and contemporary issues.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Growth Mindset and Capacity Building

EAD teachers have a growth mindset for themselves and their students, meaning that they engage in continuous self-reflection and cultivate self-knowledge. They learn and adopt content as well as practices that help all learners of diverse backgrounds reach excellence. EAD teachers need continuous and rigorous professional development (PD) and access to professional learning communities (PLCs) that offer peer support and mentoring opportunities, especially about content, pedagogical approaches, and instruction-embedded assessments.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Building an EAD-Ready Classroom and School

EAD teachers cultivate and sustain a learning environment by partnering with administrators, students, and families to conduct deep inquiry about the multifaceted stories of American constitutional democracy. They set expectations that all students know they belong and contribute to the classroom community. Students establish ownership and responsibility for their learning through mutual respect and an inclusive culture that enables students to engage courageously in rigorous discussion.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Inquiry as the Primary Mode for Learning

EAD teachers not only use the EAD Roadmap inquiry prompts as entry points to teaching full and complex content, but also cultivate students’ capacity to develop their own deep and critical inquiries about American history, civic life, and their identities and communities. They embrace these rigorous inquiries as a way to advance students’ historical and civic knowledge, and to connect that knowledge to themselves and their communities. They also help students cultivate empathy across differences and inquisitiveness to ask difficult questions, which are core to historical understanding and constructive civic participation.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Practice of Constitutional Democracy and Student Agency

EAD teachers use their content knowledge and classroom leadership to model our constitutional principle of “We the People” through democratic practices and promoting civic responsibilities, civil rights, and civic friendship in their classrooms. EAD teachers deepen students’ grasp of content and concepts by creating student opportunities to engage with real-world events and problem-solving about issues in their communities by taking informed action to create a more perfect union.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Assess, Reflect, and Improve

EAD teachers use assessments as a tool to ensure all students understand civics content and concepts and apply civics skills and agency. Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning and give feedback to their teachers in higher-order thinking exercises that enhance as well as measure learning. EAD teachers analyze and utilize feedback and assessment for self-reflection and improving instruction.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:
EAD teachers commit to learn about and teach full and multifaceted historical and civic narratives. They appreciate student diversity and assume all students’ capacity for learning complex and rigorous content. EAD teachers focus on inclusion and equity in both content and approach as they spiral instruction across grade bands, increasing complexity and depth about relevant history and contemporary issues.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Growth Mindset and Capacity Building

EAD teachers have a growth mindset for themselves and their students, meaning that they engage in continuous self-reflection and cultivate self-knowledge. They learn and adopt content as well as practices that help all learners of diverse backgrounds reach excellence. EAD teachers need continuous and rigorous professional development (PD) and access to professional learning communities (PLCs) that offer peer support and mentoring opportunities, especially about content, pedagogical approaches, and instruction-embedded assessments.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Building an EAD-Ready Classroom and School

EAD teachers cultivate and sustain a learning environment by partnering with administrators, students, and families to conduct deep inquiry about the multifaceted stories of American constitutional democracy. They set expectations that all students know they belong and contribute to the classroom community. Students establish ownership and responsibility for their learning through mutual respect and an inclusive culture that enables students to engage courageously in rigorous discussion.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Inquiry as the Primary Mode for Learning

EAD teachers not only use the EAD Roadmap inquiry prompts as entry points to teaching full and complex content, but also cultivate students’ capacity to develop their own deep and critical inquiries about American history, civic life, and their identities and communities. They embrace these rigorous inquiries as a way to advance students’ historical and civic knowledge, and to connect that knowledge to themselves and their communities. They also help students cultivate empathy across differences and inquisitiveness to ask difficult questions, which are core to historical understanding and constructive civic participation.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Practice of Constitutional Democracy and Student Agency

EAD teachers use their content knowledge and classroom leadership to model our constitutional principle of “We the People” through democratic practices and promoting civic responsibilities, civil rights, and civic friendship in their classrooms. EAD teachers deepen students’ grasp of content and concepts by creating student opportunities to engage with real-world events and problem-solving about issues in their communities by taking informed action to create a more perfect union.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Assess, Reflect, and Improve

EAD teachers use assessments as a tool to ensure all students understand civics content and concepts and apply civics skills and agency. Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning and give feedback to their teachers in higher-order thinking exercises that enhance as well as measure learning. EAD teachers analyze and utilize feedback and assessment for self-reflection and improving instruction.