Educating for American Democracy
National Forum

March 2, 2021 | 3-4:45pm ET

Schedule of Events

3:00pm

Welcome Remarks (00:18)

  • Shelly C. Lowe, Council Member, National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III, Smithsonian Institute
  • David Ferriero, National Archivist of the United States
3:15pm

Special Guest Appearances (15:57)

  • Kimberly Eckert, Director of Educator Development and 2018 Louisiana Teacher of the Year, Louisiana Department of Education and West Baton Rouge Schools
  • Johnnie Moore, Founder and CEO of The KAIROS Company, President of The Congress of Christian Leaders
3:20pm

Educating for American Democracy: A Roadmap for Our Country Panel Discussion and Q&A (21:39)

Moderated by Judy Woodruff, Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour

  • Danielle Allen, Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University
  • Paul Carrese, Founding Director, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University
  • Jane Kamensky, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard University and Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Harvard Radcliffe Institute
3:50pm

Special Guest Appearances (50:31)

  • Jill Lepore, Kemper Professor of American History and Affiliate Professor of Law, Harvard University
  • Allen Guelzo, Senior Research Scholar, The Council of the Humanities, Princeton University
  • Stephanie Sperber, Teacher, Connecticut
3:55pm

Educating for American Democracy: Prioritizing History and Civics in Every K-12 Classroom Panel Discussion and Q&A (53:36)

Moderated by Judy Woodruff, Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour

  • Louise Dubé, Executive Director, iCivics
  • Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, Director, Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University
  • Peter Levine, Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Jonathan M. Tisch College at Tufts University
  • Tammy Waller, Director of K-12 Social Studies and World Languages, Arizona Department of Education
4:30pm

Special Guest Appearances (1:29:04)

  • Jay Peledge, Teacher, Lincoln Public Schools, Massachusetts
  • Jen Reidel, Teacher, Bellingham School District, Washington
  • Ian Rowe, Co-Founder of Vertex Partnership Academies, AEI Resident Fellow, and 1776 Unites Senior Visiting Fellow
  • Van Jones, CNN Host and Dream Corps Founder
4:35pm

Closing Remarks, Poetry Reading, and Message from Educators (1:34:46)

  • Secretary Phil Rosenfelt, Former Acting U.S. Secretary of Education
  • Alondra Bobadilla, Boston Youth Poet Laureate
  • Jay Peledge, Teacher, Lincoln Public Schools, Massachusetts
  • Averill Kelley, CSIEME Doctoral Student, University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Former Educator, Clark County School District, Nevada
  • Janisha Musco, Teacher, Summer Grove Elementary, Louisiana
  • Jen Reidel, Teacher, Bellingham School District, Washington
  • Stephanie Sperber, Teacher, Connecticut
4:45pm

Adjourn

MODERATED BY

Judy Woodruff

Anchor and Managing Editor, PBS NewsHour

Broadcast journalist Judy Woodruff is the anchor and managing editor of the PBS NewsHour. She has covered politics and other news for five decades at NBC, CNN and PBS.

At PBS from 1983 to 1993, she was the chief Washington correspondent for the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour. From 1984 – 1990, she also anchored PBS’ award-winning documentary series, “Frontline with Judy Woodruff.” Moving to CNN in 1993, she served as anchor and senior correspondent for 12 years; among other duties, she anchored the weekday program “Inside Politics.”

Panelists & Project Leads

Danielle Allen

Danielle Allen

Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University

Danielle Allen is James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University. She is a political philosopher and public policy expert, who focuses on democracy innovation, public health and health equity, justice reform, education, and political economy.

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She also directs the Safra Center’s Democratic Knowledge Project, a K-16 civic education provider. Her books include Our Declaration: a reading of the Declaration of Independence in defense of equality, Cuz: an American Tragedy, and Talking to Strangers: anxieties of citizenship since Brown v. Board of Education. She has chaired numerous commission processes and is a lead author on influential policy roadmaps, including Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion; Roadmap to Pandemic Resilience; Pandemic Resilience: Getting It Done; and Our Common Purpose: Reinventing American Democracy for the 21st Century. She was for many years a contributing columnist for the Washington Post, and writes for the Atlantic.

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Danielle Allen is James Bryant Conant University Professor and Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.

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She is a political philosopher and public policy expert, who focuses on democracy innovation, public health and health equity, justice reform, education, and political economy. She also directs the Safra Center’s Democratic Knowledge Project, a K-16 civic education provider. Her books include Our Declaration: a reading of the Declaration of Independence in defense of equality, Cuz: an American Tragedy, and Talking to Strangers: anxieties of citizenship since Brown v. Board of Education. She has chaired numerous commission processes and is a lead author on influential policy roadmaps, including Pursuing Excellence on a Foundation of Inclusion; Roadmap to Pandemic Resilience; Pandemic Resilience: Getting It Done; and Our Common Purpose: Reinventing American Democracy for the 21st Century. She was for many years a contributing columnist for the Washington Post, and writes for the Atlantic.

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Paul Carrese

Founding Director, School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University

Paul Carrese is the founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University. For nearly two decades he was a professor of political science at the United States Air Force Academy.

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He is author of The Cloaking of Power: Montesquieu, Blackstone, and the Rise of Judicial Activism (University of Chicago, 2003) and co-editor of three other books – on George Washington, constitutionalism, and American grand strategy. His most recent book is Democracy in Moderation: Montesquieu, Tocqueville, and Sustainable Liberalism (Cambridge, 2016). He has held fellowships at Harvard University; the University of Delhi (as a Fulbright fellow); and the James Madison Program, Politics Department, Princeton University. He recently served on the founding advisory board of the Program on Public Discourse at UNC Chapel Hill.

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Paul Carrese is the founding director of the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University.

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For nearly two decades he was a professor of political science at the United States Air Force Academy. He is author of The Cloaking of Power: Montesquieu, Blackstone, and the Rise of Judicial Activism (University of Chicago, 2003) and co-editor of three other books – on George Washington, constitutionalism, and American grand strategy. His most recent book is Democracy in Moderation: Montesquieu, Tocqueville, and Sustainable Liberalism (Cambridge, 2016). He has held fellowships at Harvard University; the University of Delhi (as a Fulbright fellow); and the James Madison Program, Politics Department, Princeton University. He recently served on the founding advisory board of the Program on Public Discourse at UNC Chapel Hill.

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Louise Dubé

Louise Dubé

Executive Director, iCivics

Louise Dubé serves as the Executive Director of iCivics. As the largest provider in the nation, iCivics champions and re-imagines civic education. iCivics is the winner of many awards including Fast Company’s 2017 Top 10 Most Innovative Education Companies, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Award for Creative and Effective Institutions.

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Previously, Louise served as Managing Director of Digital Learning at WGBH where she helped launch PBS Learning Media, a platform reaching over 1.5 million educators. Before WGBH, Louise had a successful career in educational publishing and instructional technology for over 20 years. Louise won the 2017 People’s Voice award from the Diane Von Furstenberg – Diller Foundation as well as the 2018 Civvys – American Civic Collaboration National award from Bridge Alliance. She was also recognized as a 2019 Donaldson Fellow by the Yale School of Management. Louise began her career as an attorney in Montreal, Canada, and holds a law degree from McGill University, as well as an MBA from Yale University. In the early 1990s, she served as a co-founder of CASES, a New York alternative-to-incarceration program where education helped re-shape lives.

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Louise Dubé serves as the Executive Director of iCivics. As the largest provider in the nation, iCivics champions and re-imagines civic education.

Read More

iCivics is the winner of many awards including Fast Company’s 2017 Top 10 Most Innovative Education Companies, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Award for Creative and Effective Institutions. Previously, Louise served as Managing Director of Digital Learning at WGBH where she helped launch PBS Learning Media, a platform reaching over 1.5 million educators. Before WGBH, Louise had a successful career in educational publishing and instructional technology for over 20 years. Louise won the 2017 People’s Voice award from the Diane Von Furstenberg – Diller Foundation as well as the 2018 Civvys – American Civic Collaboration National award from Bridge Alliance. She was also recognized as a 2019 Donaldson Fellow by the Yale School of Management. Louise began her career as an attorney in Montreal, Canada, and holds a law degree from McGill University, as well as an MBA from Yale University. In the early 1990s, she served as a co-founder of CASES, a New York alternative-to-incarceration program where education helped re-shape lives.

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Jane Kamensky

Jane Kamensky

Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard University and Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Harvard Radcliffe Institute

Jane Kamensky is Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History & Pforzheimer Foundation Director, Harvard University & Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

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Her most recent book, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley (2016), won four prizes, including the New-York Historical Society’s Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize, and was a finalist for several others. She is also one of the co-authors of A People and a Nation (11th edition, 2017), long one of the leading American history textbooks across the United States. A former Commissioner of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, she currently serves as a Trustee of the Museum of the American Revolution. In addition to her work with the EAD project team, she is a member of the faculty committee of Democratic Knowledge Project at Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center.

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Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg

Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg

Director, Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) at Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University

As Director, Kei leads all of CIRCLE’s research activities while charting a vision of how that research can inform policy and practice to strengthen youth civic engagement. Kei is particularly interested in providing various organizations and communities with research that would help increase civic and political engagement among ethnic minority and immigrant populations.

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Kei earned her doctorate degree in 2008 from Loyola University Chicago in Clinical Psychology and has extensive experience in working with youth of diverse backgrounds both as a researcher and a practitioner. Throughout her graduate career, she focused her research on positive youth development, including civic engagement. Prior to joining CIRCLE, Kei taught as Visiting Instructor of Psychology at Knox College, where she became involved as an active collaborator for the Center in Galesburg, a community-based citizen organization. In collaboration with the Center in Galesburg, Kei designed a course in Community Psychology in which she taught college students about various types of engagement and actively involved them in the local community.

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As Director, Kei leads all of CIRCLE’s research activities while charting a vision of how that research can inform policy and practice to strengthen youth civic engagement.

Read More

Kei is particularly interested in providing various organizations and communities with research that would help increase civic and political engagement among ethnic minority and immigrant populations. Kei earned her doctorate degree in 2008 from Loyola University Chicago in Clinical Psychology and has extensive experience in working with youth of diverse backgrounds both as a researcher and a practitioner. Throughout her graduate career, she focused her research on positive youth development, including civic engagement. Prior to joining CIRCLE, Kei taught as Visiting Instructor of Psychology at Knox College, where she became involved as an active collaborator for the Center in Galesburg, a community-based citizen organization. In collaboration with the Center in Galesburg, Kei designed a course in Community Psychology in which she taught college students about various types of engagement and actively involved them in the local community.

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Peter Levine

Peter Levine

Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Jonathan M. Tisch College at Tufts University

Peter Levine is the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs in Tufts University’s Jonathan Tisch College of Civic Life. Trained as a moral/political philosopher, Levine has spent most of his career conducting applied empirical research and organizing professional efforts related to civic life in the United States, including sustained work on civic education, voting rights, public deliberation, social movements, and the measurement of social capital.

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His nine books include the forthcoming What Should We Do? A Theory of Civic Life (Oxford University Press). He helped to found and then led CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement), which is now part of Tisch College. He was a co-author of the Civic Mission of Schools report (2003) and the College, Career and Citizenship (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (2013). He serves on the NAEP civics committee and the boards of Discovering Justice, Everyday Democracy, the Charles F. Kettering Foundation, and Street Law, Inc.

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Peter Levine is the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Lincoln Filene Professor of Citizenship & Public Affairs in Tufts University’s Jonathan Tisch College of Civic Life.

Read More

Trained as a moral/political philosopher, Levine has spent most of his career conducting applied empirical research and organizing professional efforts related to civic life in the United States, including sustained work on civic education, voting rights, public deliberation, social movements, and the measurement of social capital. His nine books include the forthcoming What Should We Do? A Theory of Civic Life (Oxford University Press). He helped to found and then led CIRCLE (The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement), which is now part of Tisch College. He was a co-author of the Civic Mission of Schools report (2003) and the College, Career and Citizenship (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards (2013). He serves on the NAEP civics committee and the boards of Discovering Justice, Everyday Democracy, the Charles F. Kettering Foundation, and Street Law, Inc.

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Tammy Waller

Director of K-12 Social Studies and World Languages, Arizona Department of Education

Tammy Waller is the Director for K-12 Social Studies and World Languages at the Arizona Department of Education and the co-manager of the statewide Civic Education and Community Engagement Program. She also teaches at the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University.

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Prior to joining ADE 5 years ago, Tammy taught 7-12th grade social studies for 25 years in various schools in the Phoenix area and coached both Speech and Debate and Mock Trial. She is a state and national trainer for various civic education organizations and is a member of the Council for Social Studies State Supervisors and the National Council for State Supervisors of Foreign Language. A member of both the National Council for the Social Studies and the National Council for History Education, she currently sits on the board of the Arizona Council for the Social Studies. She is a 2000 Arizona Teacher of the Year Finalist and Arizona Law Related Educator of the year.

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Tammy Waller is the Director for K-12 Social Studies and World Languages at the Arizona Department of Education and the co-manager of the statewide Civic Education and Community Engagement Program.

Read More

She also teaches at the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University. Prior to joining ADE 5 years ago, Tammy taught 7-12th grade social studies for 25 years in various schools in the Phoenix area and coached both Speech and Debate and Mock Trial. She is a state and national trainer for various civic education organizations and is a member of the Council for Social Studies State Supervisors and the National Council for State Supervisors of Foreign Language. A member of both the National Council for the Social Studies and the National Council for History Education, she currently sits on the board of the Arizona Council for the Social Studies. She is a 2000 Arizona Teacher of the Year Finalist and Arizona Law Related Educator of the year.

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1

Invite others to the table

Share the The Roadmap with your network, your colleagues, your school, your community leaders.

2

Share your work

Submit lesson plans and curricular materials to illustrate what EAD looks like in the classroom.

3

Join the movement

Sign-up to be an EAD Champion, or visit the Take Action page to learn more about how individuals can use their voices and expertise to make EAD a reality.

4

Continue the dialogue

Attend one of our partner-led webinars or sign-up for office hours to learn more.

The Call

by Alondra Bobadilla, Boston’s Youth Poet Laureate

 

Sound the bells in the public square!

Make way, make way!

For from the Heavens a time of restructuring has come

For the cries for justice from the Earth have ruptured and exposed the imperfect systems

and a window of weeding has been allotted to us.

An opportunity to uproot,

to tend to the land and plant a new harvest for the generations to come.

 

No more room for half-hearted conversations

and quick advertisements,

band aids of sympathy on systemic problems.

No more room for silent submission in the classroom,

to the timeline and the apathy,

as a war for the people erupts on the outside

and the youth foam at the mouth

hungry to speak from every perspective,

they have chantings growing in their bellies

waiting for the moment,

and the moment has arrived.

 

But the moment has been bittersweet,

as the discussion that should have commenced with understanding and openness in the classroom

is unharnessed, unforgiving outcries in the square

Will we allow the same anger that the generations of old carried be transferred?

Or will we,

do as the times have called,

sit and ponder the plain realities,

the disturbing questions of ancient keeping the nation at war with itself,

from every side of the spectrum,

we take our places in this conversation.

 

The table has been set.

The disaffected have rolled in the chairs

and the youth prepared the room.

All that it needs is people to take their seats

and speak what no human ear has heard before.

Talk between opposing opinions

that actually turns into strategy

and strategy into impact,

and impact,

into a better future.

 

Written for the Educating for American Democracy initiative and premiered at the National Forum.

Watch it in the National Forum recording at the 1:41:23 minute mark.

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We the People

This theme explores the idea of “the people” as a political concept–not just a group of people who share a landscape but a group of people who share political ideals and institutions.

Read more about the theme in:

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Institutional & Social Transformation

This theme explores how social arrangements and conflicts have combined with political institutions to shape American life from the earliest colonial period to the present, investigates which moments of change have most defined the country, and builds understanding of how American political institutions and society changes.

Read more about the theme in:

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Contemporary Debates & Possibilities

This theme explores the contemporary terrain of civic participation and civic agency, investigating how historical narratives shape current political arguments, how values and information shape policy arguments, and how the American people continues to renew or remake itself in pursuit of fulfillment of the promise of constitutional democracy.

Read more about the theme in:

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Civic Participation

This theme explores the relationship between self-government and civic participation, drawing on the discipline of history to explore how citizens’ active engagement has mattered for American society and on the discipline of civics to explore the principles, values, habits, and skills that support productive engagement in a healthy, resilient constitutional democracy. This theme focuses attention on the overarching goal of engaging young people as civic participants and preparing them to assume that role successfully.

Read more about the theme in:

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Our Changing landscapes

This theme begins from the recognition that American civic experience is tied to a particular place, and explores the history of how the United States has come to develop the physical and geographical shape it has, the complex experiences of harm and benefit which that history has delivered to different portions of the American population, and the civics questions of how political communities form in the first place, become connected to specific places, and develop membership rules. The theme also takes up the question of our contemporary responsibility to the natural world.

Read more about the theme in:

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A New Government & Constitution

This theme explores the institutional history of the United States as well as the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional design.

Read more about the theme in:

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A People in the World

This theme explores the place of the U.S. and the American people in a global context, investigating key historical events in international affairs,and building understanding of the principles, values, and laws at stake in debates about America’s role in the world.

Read more about the theme in:

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

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Driving questions provide a glimpse into the types of inquiries that teachers can write and develop in support of in-depth civic learning. Think of them as a  starting point in your curricular design.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in  the Pedagogy Companion.

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Sample guiding questions are designed to foster classroom discussion, and can be starting points for one or multiple lessons. It is important to note that the sample guiding questions provided in the Roadmap are NOT an exhaustive list of questions. There are many other great topics and questions that can be explored.

Learn more about inquiry-based learning in the Pedagogy Companion.

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The Seven Themes

The Seven Themes provide the organizational  framework for the Roadmap. They map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. Importantly, they are neither standards nor curriculum, but rather a starting point for the design of standards, curricula, resources, and lessons. 

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The Five Design Challenges

America’s constitutional politics are rife with tensions and complexities. Our Design Challenges, which are arranged alongside our Themes, identify and clarify the most significant tensions that writers of standards, curricula, texts, lessons, and assessments will grapple with. In proactively recognizing and acknowledging these challenges, educators will help students better understand the complicated issues that arise in American history and civics.

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Motivating Agency, Sustaining the Republic

  • How can we help students understand the full context for their roles as civic participants without creating paralysis or a sense of the insignificance of their own agency in relation to the magnitude of our society, the globe, and shared challenges?
  • How can we help students become engaged citizens who also sustain civil disagreement, civic friendship, and thus American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we help students pursue civic action that is authentic, responsible, and informed?
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America’s Plural Yet Shared Story

  • How can we integrate the perspectives of Americans from all different backgrounds when narrating a history of the U.S. and explicating the content of the philosophical foundations of American constitutional democracy?
  • How can we do so consistently across all historical periods and conceptual content?
  • How can this more plural and more complete story of our history and foundations also be a common story, the shared inheritance of all Americans?
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Simultaneously Celebrating & Critiquing Compromise

  • How do we simultaneously teach the value and the danger of compromise for a free, diverse, and self-governing people?
  • How do we help students make sense of the paradox that Americans continuously disagree about the ideal shape of self-government but also agree to preserve shared institutions?
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Civic Honesty, Reflective Patriotism

  • How can we offer an account of U.S. constitutional democracy that is simultaneously honest about the wrongs of the past without falling into cynicism, and appreciative of the founding of the United States without tipping into adulation?
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Balancing the Concrete & the Abstract

  • How can we support instructors in helping students move between concrete, narrative, and chronological learning and thematic and abstract or conceptual learning?
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Each theme is supported by key concepts that map out the knowledge, skills, and dispositions students should be able to explore in order to be engaged in informed, authentic, and healthy civic participation. They are vertically spiraled and developed to apply to K—5 and 6—12. Importantly, they are not standards, but rather offer a vision for the integration of history and civics throughout grades K—12.

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Helping Students Participate

  • How can I learn to understand my role as a citizen even if I’m not old enough to take part in government? How can I get excited to solve challenges that seem too big to fix?
  • How can I learn how to work together with people whose opinions are different from my own?
  • How can I be inspired to want to take civic actions on my own?
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America’s Shared Story

  • How can I learn about the role of my culture and other cultures in American history?
  • How can I see that America’s story is shared by all?
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Thinking About Compromise

  • How can teachers teach the good and bad sides of compromise?
  • How can I make sense of Americans who believe in one government but disagree about what it should do?
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Honest Patriotism

  • How can I learn an honest story about America that admits failure and celebrates praise?
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Balancing Time & Theme

  • How can teachers help me connect historical events over time and themes?
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The Six Pedagogical Principles

 EAD teacher draws on six pedagogical principles that are connected sequentially.

Six Core Pedagogical Principles are part of our Pedagogy Companion. The Pedagogical Principles are designed to focus educators’ effort on techniques that best support the learning and development of student agency required of history and civic education.

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This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

EAD teachers commit to learn about and teach full and multifaceted historical and civic narratives. They appreciate student diversity and assume all students’ capacity for learning complex and rigorous content. EAD teachers focus on inclusion and equity in both content and approach as they spiral instruction across grade bands, increasing complexity and depth about relevant history and contemporary issues.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Growth Mindset and Capacity Building

EAD teachers have a growth mindset for themselves and their students, meaning that they engage in continuous self-reflection and cultivate self-knowledge. They learn and adopt content as well as practices that help all learners of diverse backgrounds reach excellence. EAD teachers need continuous and rigorous professional development (PD) and access to professional learning communities (PLCs) that offer peer support and mentoring opportunities, especially about content, pedagogical approaches, and instruction-embedded assessments.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Building an EAD-Ready Classroom and School

EAD teachers cultivate and sustain a learning environment by partnering with administrators, students, and families to conduct deep inquiry about the multifaceted stories of American constitutional democracy. They set expectations that all students know they belong and contribute to the classroom community. Students establish ownership and responsibility for their learning through mutual respect and an inclusive culture that enables students to engage courageously in rigorous discussion.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Inquiry as the Primary Mode for Learning

EAD teachers not only use the EAD Roadmap inquiry prompts as entry points to teaching full and complex content, but also cultivate students’ capacity to develop their own deep and critical inquiries about American history, civic life, and their identities and communities. They embrace these rigorous inquiries as a way to advance students’ historical and civic knowledge, and to connect that knowledge to themselves and their communities. They also help students cultivate empathy across differences and inquisitiveness to ask difficult questions, which are core to historical understanding and constructive civic participation.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Practice of Constitutional Democracy and Student Agency

EAD teachers use their content knowledge and classroom leadership to model our constitutional principle of “We the People” through democratic practices and promoting civic responsibilities, civil rights, and civic friendship in their classrooms. EAD teachers deepen students’ grasp of content and concepts by creating student opportunities to engage with real-world events and problem-solving about issues in their communities by taking informed action to create a more perfect union.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Assess, Reflect, and Improve

EAD teachers use assessments as a tool to ensure all students understand civics content and concepts and apply civics skills and agency. Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning and give feedback to their teachers in higher-order thinking exercises that enhance as well as measure learning. EAD teachers analyze and utilize feedback and assessment for self-reflection and improving instruction.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:
EAD teachers commit to learn about and teach full and multifaceted historical and civic narratives. They appreciate student diversity and assume all students’ capacity for learning complex and rigorous content. EAD teachers focus on inclusion and equity in both content and approach as they spiral instruction across grade bands, increasing complexity and depth about relevant history and contemporary issues.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Growth Mindset and Capacity Building

EAD teachers have a growth mindset for themselves and their students, meaning that they engage in continuous self-reflection and cultivate self-knowledge. They learn and adopt content as well as practices that help all learners of diverse backgrounds reach excellence. EAD teachers need continuous and rigorous professional development (PD) and access to professional learning communities (PLCs) that offer peer support and mentoring opportunities, especially about content, pedagogical approaches, and instruction-embedded assessments.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Building an EAD-Ready Classroom and School

EAD teachers cultivate and sustain a learning environment by partnering with administrators, students, and families to conduct deep inquiry about the multifaceted stories of American constitutional democracy. They set expectations that all students know they belong and contribute to the classroom community. Students establish ownership and responsibility for their learning through mutual respect and an inclusive culture that enables students to engage courageously in rigorous discussion.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Inquiry as the Primary Mode for Learning

EAD teachers not only use the EAD Roadmap inquiry prompts as entry points to teaching full and complex content, but also cultivate students’ capacity to develop their own deep and critical inquiries about American history, civic life, and their identities and communities. They embrace these rigorous inquiries as a way to advance students’ historical and civic knowledge, and to connect that knowledge to themselves and their communities. They also help students cultivate empathy across differences and inquisitiveness to ask difficult questions, which are core to historical understanding and constructive civic participation.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Practice of Constitutional Democracy and Student Agency

EAD teachers use their content knowledge and classroom leadership to model our constitutional principle of “We the People” through democratic practices and promoting civic responsibilities, civil rights, and civic friendship in their classrooms. EAD teachers deepen students’ grasp of content and concepts by creating student opportunities to engage with real-world events and problem-solving about issues in their communities by taking informed action to create a more perfect union.

X
This resource aligns with the core pedagogical principle of:

Assess, Reflect, and Improve

EAD teachers use assessments as a tool to ensure all students understand civics content and concepts and apply civics skills and agency. Students have the opportunity to reflect on their learning and give feedback to their teachers in higher-order thinking exercises that enhance as well as measure learning. EAD teachers analyze and utilize feedback and assessment for self-reflection and improving instruction.